#ROW80: End of Summer Edition

Click to visit the challenge!
Click to visit the challenge!

Last weekend of summer, and the end of the second month of blogging every day. So far, so good. Things are going well on the Evernote front as well. The summary:

  • Blog every day: Done yet again. I want to recognize Lisa Lawler from the Stepping Stones blog for leaving the 2000th comment here. Sorry I have nothing to give away, Lisa, but thank you. And thank you to everyone who’s followed this blog and who has left a comment since this blog has been around. You give me the push I need to keep doing this. So, this week’s entries:
  • Learn about Evernote: I’ll be starting the informational posts on this next month. I’m not going to get into too much of the fancy stuff, because I used very little of it, but I’ll make it as meaty as I can. I also spent some time this week planning out the tags that I’d like to start using with it. I’ve just been willy-nilly adding tags to things and there hasn’t been much rhyme or reason to what I’m doing. Changing the tags and the way the notes I have .

I had access to my Kindle this week, so I did some reading. One book was Along the Ravenswood by Eileen Robertson Hamer. It’s the second book in her “Chicago Stories” series featuring Seraphy Pellegrini, an injured former Marine and military contractor who moves back to Chicago and works as an architect, and solves mysteries along the way. I read the first book, Chicago Stories: West of Western, earlier this year, and developed a bit of a crush on the main character, so I had to read the next book. I had to give the second book three stars on Amazon, five stars for the concept and two for the execution of it; I think Ms. Hamer should have shown it to more beta readers and a good editor.

I’m currently halfway through Ball Four, Jim Bouton’s journal of his 1969 season with the Seattle Pilots and Houston Astros. When it came out in 1970, all hell broke loose in Major League Baseball, because unlike most baseball books published before this one, he told it the way he saw it. Rather than putting baseball’s heroes on pedestals, he brought them down to earth, and showed what happens when 25 men between the ages of 21 and 40 spend most of the year together playing a kid’s game. Seeing players as young men who sometimes got drunk, sometimes used drugs, sometimes hung around on roofs and fire escapes in hotels trying to see women in various stages of undress, and who constantly ripped on each other, the coaches, team management, and fans, all the while worrying about their health and about getting bad news, like being traded, being sent down to the minors, being told that they’re being released, etc. made the players human. Like so many other baseball fans, reading it the first time made me a baseball fan for life, and it gets more enjoyable every time I read it.

One last thing: the Scrivener webinar that I discussed a week ago Friday was this past Thursday. I got the recording and have listened to it a couple of times. I was already familiar with a lot of what he talked about, but there were a couple of interesting things I learned, that I’ll probably talk about in a later post.

Until next time, straight ahead.

18 thoughts on “#ROW80: End of Summer Edition

  1. I love that you’ve included learning on your list of goals. I’ve been doing a lot of learning recently myself. I plan to continue to do so indefinitely. Happy Learning and Happy Blogging

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      1. I was going to use Evernote, but it was “just one more thing” for me. I trust it will be very helpful for you.

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  2. Sounds like you had a busy but good week! I’m not a baseball fan (me and the fam are tennis people ;P), but Ball Four sounds like a good book that really makes their stories personal and intimate (and I’m a sucker for stories like this). ;D

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    1. Historically, it was the first sports book that dared to speak of athletes in anything but glowing terms. As such it was considered scandalous and a lot of the players who were in it refused to have anything to do with Bouton after it was published. Fans, on the other hand, loved it, especially kids like me, who grew up idolizing ballplayers. Rather than leaving us with a negative impression, it made us love the guys who play the game, and maybe taught us that the whole “hero-worship” thing was silly. It took a lot of shock out of things like Pete Rose being banned for life from consideration for the Hall of Fame, hearing that players end up with drug problems and go broke, and that life is a mess for them off the field, just as it is for the rest of us. I highly recommend it, even if you’re not a baseball fan (and you might find that you are one after reading it).

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  3. When you post on Evernote, I get curious. I’ve only used it for a notepad so far. One day I plan to look at it more. Have you tried remember the milk for tasks.

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  4. You are staying busy on the blog. I think you should start doing a Battle of the Bands post on the first and 15th of each month. With your musical range and knowledge I think you’d come up with some good match-ups.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

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  5. Congrats on another great week! I’ll be interested to see your Evernote posts. I’ve considered trying it, but there’s so much to it, it sounds like one of those software products where you spend as much time (if not more) learning it as using it.

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    1. A lot of Evernote’s functions are things I don’t think I’ll use, so my approach is “here’s what I do with it.” You’re right, the product is massive, and you cold easily spend the rest of your life finding everything. I finally decided I have neither the time nor the inclination to learn EEEeeverything.

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  6. But. Baseball is NOT a kid’s game. That books is on my to read list, Also, I was very glad to read about Amy and her recovery. Have a good week.

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    1. You’ve never read Ball Four? There are some who say it’s the best sports book ever written. Hyperbole aside, it is a very good book, funny yet poignant, and Bouton is very intelligent. It’s a definite must-read.

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