The Friday 5×2: RIP Fats Domino

Whatever I had planned for this week is going to have to wait. We lost one of the great pioneers in rock ‘n’ roll and R&B the other day, Antoine “Fats” Domino. He was 89 years young. Here are a few songs I chose that I happen to like, and I hope you do, too. I tried not to pick ones everyone was familiar with.

  1. “Everybody’s Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Monkey” Fats was a big influence on The Beatles, but I don’t remember them covering any of his songs. He covered several of theirs, though. This is a non-album single he released in 1969. I’m just sorry it didn’t chart; I almost like his version better.
  2. “Lady Madonna” One of two Beatles covers he did for his 1968 album Fats Is Back, this was released as a single and just made it to #100 on the Hot 100. Cash Box had it at #87.
  3. “Lovely Rita (Meter Maid)” Also from Fats Is Back, this was released later in 1968 but failed to chart.
  4. “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” Fats wasn’t above doing standards occasionally. This was from his 1961 album Let The Four Winds Blow but wasn’t released as a single until 1963. It got as high as #114, what Billboard calls “the bubbling-under chart.”
  5. “I’m Ready” This was released in April 1959 and reached #16 on both the Hot 100 and Cash Box top singles chart and #7 on the R&B chart.
  6. “Korea Blues” The flip side of his 1950 single “Every Night About This Time,” which peaked at #5 on the R&B chart. I liked it for its historical significance. Notice that Fats’ voice is about an octave higher here.
  7. “Don’t You Lie To Me” From February 1951. It failed to chart, but I like it, anyway.
  8. “I Want To Walk You Home” A hit for him in 1959, it reached #8 on the Hot 100, #9 in the Cash Box chart, #1 on the R&B chart, and #14 in the UK. My favorite of his songs.
  9. “Blue Monday” Fats and a ton of other music acts, including Little Richard, Gene Vincent, The Treniers, The Platters, and Julie London, were in 1956’s The Girl Can’t Help It, starring Jayne Mansfield and Tom Ewell. This was one of Fats’ contributions, and reached #5 on the Hot 100, #8 on the Cash Box chart, #1 on the R&B chart, and #23 in the UK.
  10. “When The Saints Go Marchin’ In” Fats’ New Orleans roots show here. He played this at the end of his shows. I won’t spoil the fun by telling you what will happen, but it’s worth the twelve-minute investment in time. Trust me on that.

I have this vision of Fats in his white suit making his way into Paradise. Bless him. Au revoir, Fats Domino.

Thats the Friday 5×2 for October 27, 2017.

10 thoughts on “The Friday 5×2: RIP Fats Domino

  1. A wonderful tribute to a great man and, from what I had heard and seen, a very sweet man but I don’t know enough. He had a unique sound as well which you have showcased in the music here

    Like

    1. He was a rock & roll pioneer in the same way that Muddy Waters and Johnny Cash were: not really rock, but impossible to think of it existing if they hadn’t been around. Fats added a healthy dash of gumbo file to the mix. I always saw him as a New Orleans musician first and a rocker second. Don’t know if that makes any sense, but that’s the best way I can explain it.

      Like

  2. Hi John – he was obviously a huge influence on the music industry … and it always amazes me how many musicians found inspiration in others … and I, who am relatively unmusical, am finding out more now. I’ve always loved his music = but had never realised he’d met and worked with the Beatles … lovely tribute and I’ll be back to listen through again later on … I do like his rendition of Lady Madonna … lovely post – thank you for the time putting these up for us – cheers Hilary

    Like

You can use Markdown in your comments. Thanks for your comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s