Monday’s Music Moves Me: Top 10 from WJJD 62 Years Ago Today

On June 11, 1956 I was almost three months old, and while rock ‘n’ roll was starting to take over the charts, a lot of popular music was still what we’d call “easy listening.” Oldiesloon, my source for surveys from the Chicago area and others, has as their oldest survey the one from WJJD on that day. Here are the Top 10. I’m kind of running late today, so I’m going to run down the Top 10 without my usual attention to the history behind the performers and songs. Hope that’s okay…

  1. The Chordettes, “Born To Be With You”
  2. Elvis Presley, “Heartbreak Hotel”
  3. Don Robertson, “The Happy Whistler”
  4. Carl Perkins, “Blue Suede Shoes”
  5. The Fontaine Sisters, “I’m In Love Again”
  6. Cathy Carr, “Ivory Tower”
  7. The Ames Brothers, “It Only Hurts For A Little While” (NOTE: Oldiesloon says The Four Aces did this song, but I can’t find any evidence that it was them. There is every indication that The Ames Brothers did it, however, so I’m going with them.)
  8. Pat Boone, “I Almost Lost My Mind”
  9. The Four Lads, “Standing On The Corner”
  10. The George Cates Orchestra, “Moonglow/Theme from “Picnic”

And that’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for June 11, 2018.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, Alana, Michelle and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.


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21 thoughts on “Monday’s Music Moves Me: Top 10 from WJJD 62 Years Ago Today

  1. John,

    I listened to your playlist while I was busy in the kitchen making home-made buttermilk biscuits. You can tell, I’m a southern gal! In 1956, my mother was 11-years old. I wouldn’t happen into her life until 5-years down the line. You gotta remember, girls in southern WV married young and started families early. Although I got married at 17 I couldn’t see myself with a kid….EVER! It took us more than 9-years before we had our first child. There were no problem that was just our choice. Anyhow, this isn’t a post about marrying and having kids young. ADHD self (or maybe I’m just gabby) gets sidetracked. 😀 I’m going through your songs a second time while I visit others and leave my footprints here. Most of your selections I’ve heard many times. You’ve definitely featured some great ones. The only artists I knew by name in this lineup are Elvis, Carl Perkins, & Pat Boone. The others I can’t say for sure but like I said most of the song did register. Thanks spinning this oldie sampler for the 4M gang’s enjoyment. Have a tunetastic week!

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  2. Ah, instrumentals! The Happy Whistler (which I was not familiar with) reminded me a little bit of the original Match Game theme, which it isn’t, but still…and there is the future mega hit for Elvis on the survey. The other non instrumentals? Maybe I’m happy that I’m too young to remember.

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  3. Hi John,
    This was an interesting set of songs here. So interesting how there is so much variety in these Top 10s from yesteryear!
    My favos are Blue Suede Shoes and of course Heartbreak Hotel. I was surprised that Elvis’ song was so far down on the top 10 list. I would’ve thought it to be higher. But maybe it was just starting to chart and climb? Or maybe it had already peaked and was on its way down?
    I also enjoyed the Fontaine Sisters.

    Thanks for taking us way back…I wasn’t even a thought yet… 🙂

    Have a great week,
    Michele at Angels Bark

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    1. This was their first survey, so I don’t know how high it had gotten, but my guess is it was on its way down the chart: the next JJD survey from 6/25 had it at #10, and the following week it had dropped to #26. Wikipedia says it was released in January ’56 but didn’t start moving up the chart until March. Meantime “I Want You, I Need You, I Love You” was on its way up.

      Incidentally, Chet Atkins and Floyd Cramer were on that track. So saith Wikipedia…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. wow, that’s interesting info, Chet Atkins and Floyd Cramer. I guess it shouldn’t be so surprising that musicians have so many interactions and collaborations with each other, all being in the same industry, but it still always surprises me when I learn things like this.
        I didn’t know the Heartbreak Hotel lyrics were sparked from an actual suicide that made the news. Another interesting tidbit…

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        1. When Elvis started recording on RCA, Chet Atkins was head of A&R and Floyd Cramer was a session pianist there. Mary and I watch The best of The Ed Sullivan Show, and in one episode Chet, Floyd and Boots Randolph did a segment where each of them got to do a song accompanied by the others. It was amazing how well they were able to work together.

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  4. I really enjoy Elvis but I haven’t ever been a huge fan. What I associate with him, though, is my grandparents, who seemed not to care about any music at all, had a random Elvis gospel hits CD I only found once they had passes. Weird.

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  5. When it’s Friday and you’re just now listening to Monday — lol — but I didn’t wanna miss this one! Few of my ‘childhood’ memories in here, mostly with Grandma, but oh, that whistlin — impossible to be in a bad mood when I listen to that one 😀 Great list!

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  6. Whenever I see W call letters ending in D, I always think of the late Harry Chapin –
    “I am the morning DJ on WOLD-D-D-D
    Playing all the hits for you wherever you may be.”

    Harry would be 76 today if he hadn’t been killed in a Long Island car crash in 1981. His shows were always great fun – he said playing at UIUC in Champaign-Urbana was like playing on home court.

    Actor Ed Ames, perhaps best known for his role as Mingo on Daniel Boone, was one of the Ames Brothers.

    I’m familiar with just three of these tunes from 1956:
    Elvis, “Heartbreak Hotel”
    Don Robertson, “The Happy Whistler”
    Carl Perkins, “Blue Suede Shoes”

    You couldn’t get away from Elvis on the radio, TV or movies in the 1950s and 1960s – he even played my alma mater UIUC in the mid-1970s. (I didn’t go – tickets were available by lottery only, due to excessive demand.)

    For some reason, Missoula, MT radio liked “The Happy Whistler” so I remember hearing it in the early 1960s. That was from the days when you could be a professional whistler.

    And I played “Blue Suede Shoes” onstage as part of Horizon Brass Rock’s ’50s medley.

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    1. In the Chicago area, that would be WJJD and WIND, and probably one or two others over the years.

      Do you remember Ed Ames demonstrating tomahawk throwing on The Tonight Show? https://youtu.be/0L5QC9ZJkM8 They say it was the biggest laugh ever on that show.

      In an earlier comment I link to a post of mine of songs that were entirely whistled. For my money, the best whistler was Toots Thielemans, who was also a superb guitarist and harmonicist.

      All the BS aside, do you miss the musician’s life?

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