Story Of My Life #1LinerWeds #JusJoJan

I might have gotten this from one of you, so thanks. Old Al was absolutely correct.


One-Liner Wednesday is brought to you each week by Linda Hill and this station. This month, it’s also part of Just Jot It January. Two birds, one stone.

Now, here’s the lovely Linda Evans for Crystal Light. She believes in Crystal Light, because she believes in herself! (Kind of clumsy when you put it in third person, ain’t it?)

28 thoughts on “Story Of My Life #1LinerWeds #JusJoJan

  1. I would add dogs to that saying:) Animals really know how to help us through tough times. That commercial is so 80s that it made me smile.

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    1. Dogs and cats, anyway; I’m not sure that other animals have the same capacity for affection. And yeah, there’s something quintessentially ’80’s about Linda Evans in a leotard and leg warmers (I’m assuming).

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  2. I thought I would jump in on this daily prompt…Asked the husband for some, “One-liner’s,” and he said he didn’t know any. So I googled it and OMG I was ROTFL so hard. But I’m still going to do it, I just have to get something done so I’m going to go to Starbucks to plan my day πŸ™‚

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      1. I’m still here, but really I’m going now feeling really good about my blog..Y A Y and I might just try an Americano. Thanks for stopping by Mr. John and I really need to thank you for keeping me trying new things and learning. You have been very inspiring to me and my blog and for that I really mean it when I say, “Thank You ;)”

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        1. I have two left, and they’re older cats. We decided after my stroke to let nature take its course and not adopt anymore. We’re retired and I’m disabled, and I think we’ve done more than our part to give cats a good home….

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          1. Ok. I just started volunteering at a cat shelter for cats with FIV (half the shelter is for them and half for non-FIV). They roam freely in what is actually a ranch home. It feels good to help them out.

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              1. I’m sure you know the right names for it as surely as I don’t. They said it is the equivalent of human AIDS so I created the FIV. What do those acronyms stand for? They told me they are one of the largest in the country for taking these cats in. They also get something called Kalisi (sp?) that is very contagious. My son and his wife have been volunteering there for probably 5 years. Thank you, it’s only 1.5 – 2 hrs every other weekend at this point but it is something.

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                  1. Thank you very much. I know that some get acute pancreatitis also and drop weight like crazy because their bodies can’t metabolize food 😦 What is so heartrending is when they keep up their spirits but so skinny.

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                  2. will be reading up on Calicivirus. They put them in seclusion and have a special team come in to disinfect the quarantine room once they are out of there. They use something called Odoban and Accell for the whole building but not sure what else they use in there. I’m still in training until the 23rd.

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                    1. I volunteered with the local humane society for a short while. They must have had a hundred adult cats living there; it was like they were afraid to give them forever homes. People who wanted to adopt a cat went through a more thorough vetting than people looking for Top Secret clearance, I swear. Kittens were never a problem, neither were dogs, but they were overprotective of the cats. I went in one day and they were washing everything down with bleach because one of their recent intakes was FeLV-positive, which they only learned after the cat had been there for a day or two. You have to wonder sometimes…

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                    2. They are pretty particular with who gets the cats. What I’m learning is that a LOT of them go home as fosters or get adopted by the volunteers πŸ™‚ There really is such a thing as a crazy cat lady πŸ˜‰ This place is meticulous about keeping the cats isolated when they first get there, in an intake room, and they get tested twice for everything a certain period of time apart to make sure they are clear before getting into the population. Some cats come in with things, get treated, then test clean, and then they can move over to the other side. They also have a policy that if you adopt a cat and it doesn’t work out you have to bring the cat back to them. They also have meticulous notes on each cat, where some are just not adoptable because of medical issues or spraying, etc.

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