Saxophone #atozchallenge (Also Monday’s Music Moves Me!)

Adolphe Sax was a Belgian clarinetist and flautist who, while he was working on improvements to the bass clarinet, had an idea for an instrument that had the power and range of a brass instrument (such as the trumpet) while maintaining most of the features of a woodwind. He received a patent for the saxophone in 1846.

Although typically made of brass, the saxophone is considered a woodwind instrument, because rather than the player vibrating their lips into a cupped mouthpiece like a typical brass instrument (trumpet, trombone, etc.), the player blows through a reed that’s held in place in a mouthpiece. There are about a dozen different types of saxophone, but the ones most commonly used are the soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone.

L-R: alto, soprano and tenor (curved) saxophones (Ommeh at English Wikipedia [Public domain])

Saxophones can be curved, which is most common, or straight, like the soprano sax Kenny G plays. It’s popular in marching bands and in jazz, smooth jazz, blues, and rock.

Since today is also Monday, and because Monday around here is “Monday’s Music Moves Me!” day, how about some saxophone music?

  1. David Sanborn, “Chicago Song” David on alto sax. He got his start with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band.
  2. The Dave Brubeck Quartet, “Take Five” Featuring Paul Desmond on alto sax. One of the most recognizable jazz tunes, from their Time Out album.
  3. Bud Shank, “Michelle” I first heard Bud playing flute on an interesting album with Japanese koto player Kimio Eto. He also worked with the LA4 and did plenty of solo work, including an album of him playing the tenor sax.
  4. Phil Woods, “Stolen Moments” Another one of those players I heard on an album I picked up somewhere along the way. Mary is a knitter, and one of her “gurus” is Meg Swansen, who is the daughter of another knitting guru, Elizabeth Zimmerman. Meg’s husband Chris used to play keyboards with Phil.
  5. Astrud Gilberto and Stan Getz, “The Girl From Ipanema” Tenor saxophonist Stan Getz had already made a name for himself in the bebop and West Coast jazz scenes when he connected with Antonio Carlos Jobim and became an impoertant name in bossa nova. Astrud Gilberto is one of the premier chanteuses in bossa nova.
  6. Jr. Walker & The All-Stars, “Shotgun” Jr. was a tenor player and singer who could blow with the best of them. This topped the R&B chart and was #4 on the Hot 100 in 1965.
  7. King Curtis, “Soul Twist” A great tenor sax player whose life was cut tragically short. This was #1 on the R&B chart in 1962.
  8. Boots Randolph, “Yakety Sax” A song that will forever be connected with Benny Hill, Boots worked out of Nashville and was part of the “Nashville Sound” promoted by Chet Atkins when Chet was running RCA’s Nashville operation. There are lots of videos of Boots with Chet and pianist Floyd Cramer.
  9. Gerry Mulligan, “Bernie’s Tune” I wanted to get an example of baritone sax, and who better than the man best known for playing the instrument?
  10. Kenny G, “Songbird” Again, wanted to get an example of soprano sax, and Kenny might be the best around right now.

So that’s “S” day in the A to Z Challenge and Monday’s Music Moves Me for April 22, 2019.

34 thoughts on “Saxophone #atozchallenge (Also Monday’s Music Moves Me!)

  1. Good word choice, John. I might have gone with the Homer Simpson variety (I know, I know) when he bought Lisa her sax he called it a “Saxamaphone” As for songs, I’ll go with “Yakety Sax”

    Like

    1. I was about to say “doesn’t Lisa play the sax?” When you said “saxamaphone,” I started thinking of Steely Dan’s “Deacon Blues” and how the chorus would sound…. “learn to play the saxamaphone”

      “Yakety Sax” is such a great song, and of course I immediately think of Benny Hill…

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I never thought of it, but now that you mention the mouthpiece, of course it’s a woodwind!
    As for music, I’d pick a selection from Morphine. My favorites are Scratch, Gone for Good, and Whisper. Actually, Scratch would be my top pick, I love the lyrics, especially about taking “free advice,” and how you “get what you pay for.”
    Anytime my daughter hears it though, she complains about the “damn sax!”

    Like

  3. How wonderful for all of us that Sax fit both Music Moves Me and your A to Z theme, because, first, I knew eight of these 10 (a new world’s record for your blog offerings) and second, because you hit some favorites – Yakaty Sax, Take Five, and Songbird. Having a mellow moment here in the backyard watching a bee buzz around some of my spring flowers. Thank you!!

    Like

  4. Well, guess who was born in Chicago… hehehe….. I love the saxophone. Totally fabulous tune also. Well, all I can say is that you’ve done your homework really well my friend. It’s super late and I’ve only listened to half, but I’m sure the rest is awesome…. I may be back in the a.m. hehehehe~ Goodnight… thank you

    Like

  5. John,

    Great sax playlist. I listened to it while I did some catch-up in Blogosphere. Kenny G is a favorite! Thanks for sharing on the dance floor and happy a2zing, my friend!

    <a href=”https://curiousasacathy.com/2019/04/2019-the-little-mermaid-art-sketch-series-sebastian-scuttle-atozchallenge/’>A2Z Little Mermaid art sketch series ‘Sebastian & Scuttle’

    Like

    1. Oops, I goofed <a href=”https://curiousasacathy.com/2019/04/2019-the-little-mermaid-art-sketch-series-sebastian-scuttle-atozchallenge/’>A2Z Little Mermaid art sketch series ‘Sebastian & Scuttle’

      Like

  6. I’ve always loved good saxophone! 🙂 I’m tickled that my 5th grader (who’s playing clarinet in band this year) is thinking about taking up the sax next year in middle school. We’ll see if he still decides that – but after school practice at home will be more pleasurable to the ears if he does! 😉 Thanks for the dance! 🙂

    Like

    1. Trust me, that’s just a small sample of saxophone songs. I was lucky that it was a free day on MMMM; I chose “saxophone” to take advantage of it. Glad you enjoyed it!

      Like

You can use Markdown in your comments. Thanks for your comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s