When Noise Is Quieter Than Silence #socs

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

The closest I get to silence is a ringing in my ears (particularly the right ear) in an otherwise-silent room. I find I have to block it out using white noise, like this…

I won’t blame you if you don’t listen until the end: it’s 10 hours of white noise and you probably have better things to do.

I was about to get into a long discussion of the different kinds of noise and into areas such as isochronic tones and binaural beats, but I think I’ll hold those for another time. Besides, I’ve talked about this on several occasions.

You’re welcome!

Seriously, there are all kinds of resources that are available, from websites to recordings to noise generators that you can download to your phone. There are noise machines that will play the sound of the ocean all night. Heck, you can just get a fan and put in the room where you’re sleeping or trying to focus on something.

You know what works well? The sounds of an airport terminal, a crowded restaurant, or appliances running.

I should put together a list of resources when I’m not limited to a minimum of research…


Stream of Consciousness Saturday is brought to you each week by Linda Hill and this station. Now a word about Faultless spray-on starch with new Dirtgard Action.

27 thoughts on “When Noise Is Quieter Than Silence #socs

  1. This is really interesting to discover new words for something I’ve perceived on a subconscious? level. I have a white noise maker, but your youtube video has a deeper pitch and is more soothing.

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    1. You have to experiment and see what works the best. I have recordings, plus a few apps on my phone, and can easily bring up YouTube to play those. I’m really into it…

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  2. Mine is bad today and I have all noises off. I have to go to the movies later (Rocketman & already bought a ticket), so I hope it calms a bit as my migraine meds work. They are mysteriously connected. When the ringing is loudest, I don’t want more sounds, but luckily if I’m tired enough I can sleep.

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  3. My late best friend had continuous ringing in her ears from cancer treatment when she was in her late 20’s. It saved her life but damaged her in a number of ways. I have tinnitus and have had it since a child – fortunately not every day – I never knew until the past five years (perhaps) even what it was. When you are that young you think it is normal – and I never questioned it. I can’t imagine living with these issues continuously, having just occasional tastes of it. My best friend would keep the TV on every waking moment just as background noise. I did find the video relaxing but no, I didn’t listen to it for all 10 hours.

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  4. I was skeptical at first but our white noise machine really does help with sleep. Airport terminal or crowded restaurant are surprises for me. I’d love to read your list if you go forward to make one.

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    1. I’ll work on it. There are so many resources and the number just gets bigger all the time. Maybe I’ll start with the ones I use and let otheres chip in with their sources.

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  5. Great take on the prompt, John. Ever since I had kids, I’ve had a fan running while I sleep. To drown out the unnecessary ramblings in my head. If the sounds are louder than the fan, I know I need to pay attention. LOL!

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      1. Yes, it is. My husband has the ringing in his ears and isn’t necessarily a fan of having a fan humming, but he’s kind to let me keep it on so I can sleep.

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        1. I had been wearing headphones so as not to keep Mary awake, but I had to lie on my back and I would snore and keep her awake anyway. I went to a little speaker, and now she finds it relaxing and easier to sleep that way.

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          1. You’re so kind to consider her needs. LOL – I had to chuckle…Mr. snores, so it’s fair game when it comes to me playing counter to it with the fan noise! πŸ˜‰

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    1. Everyone’s different. I use various recordings of thunderstorms and several apps that generate the sounds of rain and thunderstorms. They work better than the more technically oriented white (and other colors) noise generators, although they’re really doing the same thing.

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