Crunch, Crunch, Crunch, Crunch, Crunch #socs

The prompt “dirty/clean” made me think of household cleaners, which you might remember I talked about in January 2018 as part of Just Jot It January. Maybe household cleaners are foremost on my mind because I’ve been sort of binge-watching episodes of the 1973 reboot of The Match Game.

Probably because daytime shows had so many commercials, I looked forward to them as much as the shows themselves. As I said back a year and a half ago, I would actually be interested in why some households preferred Tide, others preferred Cheer, and still others preferred Fab for doing their laundry, or why some people preferred Crest over Colgate for brushing their teeth, and whether people ate Figurines because they tasted good, because they wanted to lose weight, or because they liked the commercials with the lady singing “Figurines, crunch crunch crunch crunch crunch!” (I know that was the way I would want to eat them. The woman singing the jingle was quite attractive.)

When I was a kid, my life’s ambition was to write commercials. Somehow I forgot all about that when I went to college. The thing was, all the big ad agencies were based in Chicago. I could have foregone college (yeah, like my mother would have stood for that) and tried to get a job with one of them. Really, any old job would have done, even delivering the mail or moving spotlights and props around. Get my foot in the door.

Ah, there I go second-guessing myself again.


Stream of Consciousness Saturday is brought to you by Linda Hill and this station. Now this from our friends at Burger King.

This king isn’t quite as creepy as the one they have now. Wonder who thought that was a good idea…

41 thoughts on “Crunch, Crunch, Crunch, Crunch, Crunch #socs

  1. I really do think the commercials were better back in the day. Ring around the collar — which one was that? Loved those commercials.
    Tide for a long, long time, because my mother bought Tide and her mother bought Tide. Also, here in Indy we could buy it in 5 gallon buckets from someone connected to P&G, but then we switched to gentler, non-toxic Mrs Meyers a few years ago.
    Sensodyne cause dentist says so. If I’m very good and very lucky, I won’t have to go back to the scrip-paste.
    I agree, though, it’s funny how things come to be “our brand”. Some of it doesn’t matter to me, but when it does, it really, really does.
    You coulda been a 1970s Mad Men character, John. That’s the problem with being a bright and creative person. There are many paths.

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    1. “Ring Around The Collar” was Wisk, for a long time the only liquid laundry detergent (now they all are). You could pour it on the dirty collars and didn’t have to scrub them before putting them in the washer.

      I think Mary uses Purex now; I don’t go down the basement stairs now for fear of falling, so I really don’t know. Mom always used Tide, and I think Walkie (Mom’s mother, my grandmother) used it as well. Mary also uses Sensodyne, while I use Crest gel, but really, I ain’t fussy. I’ll use anything the dentist gives me.

      I’ve never seen “Mad Men”; maybe I can catch it on some streaming service.

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      1. John, you can watch Mad Men on Netflix. Maybe you’ll like it. It’s highly acclaimed.
        WISK! Yes, that’s it. Thanks.

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  2. I loved watching Match Game too! I sure miss good ol’ commercials. Nowadays, Mr. and I look at each other and say, “What was that commercial for?!” A super interesting book (yeah, my term for it) is called The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. In it, he talks about the way Pepsodent took off as being popular. Have you heard about it?
    Happy Saturday! Hope you’re having a great weekend!

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  3. We use Gain detergent. Tide (according to my mom) makes too many suds and thereby causes problems with the washing machine. Happy Saturday!

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  4. I had forgotten about Figurines. Yuck. I always enjoyed the commercials too. Second guessing is my go to on everything. Career wise I will always regret not going to law school. But most days I think that would’ve been too much work. And we already have too many lawyers. Things always turn out as they were meant to be.

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    1. While I don’t regret getting my degree, in a way I wish I had pushed back on it and worked for a while and tried a few different jobs before going after it. Let’s face it, I had no idea what I wanted to major in or what I wanted to do when they handed me my diploma and kicked me out the door, and I think I speak for almost everyone when I say that.

      I never had Figurines. I just remember the commercials.

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  5. The Burger King king is in the same category as creepy clowns, IMO. We used to buy what was on sale or the least expensive! Now, I have my favs, especially toothpaste!

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    1. Mom was definitely a creature of habit; comparison shopping wasn’t her thing. We do some comparison shopping, but more often than not we buy the same brands of everything. Habit, don’t you know…

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  6. Remember Ayds? Lots of women I babysat for had boxes of Ayds on the counter. You were supposed to grab one instead of a big snack. They tasted just like a chewy caramel, but they vanished immediately when AIDS hit the news.

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    1. I remember, although the women in my family didn’t use them. They preferred Metrecal for lunch. Remember that? I heard about them pulling Ayds off the market, but evidently they renamed them Diet Ayds and they were still around until about 1988. Wikipedia is great…

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      1. I never heard of Metrecal and didn’t know about Diet Ayds! I’d been long since over babysitting by then, so there were no houses to snoop in. Sad!

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    1. Mom used Glo-Coat to wax the floors, despite other things being cheaper and evidently just as good. Maybe it was the whole “black heel marks” thing.

      Remember when Burger King was getting started they had an animated king? That was about the only one that wasn’t creepy, and even then it was creepy.

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  7. John,I think our household used whatever was cheapest. I know we bought detergent that included free glassware so that may have been an incentive. Toothpaste, I seem to remember Pepsodent in our house — “you’ll wonder where the yellow went”. I remember as a kid wanting the toothpaste that had ‘stripes’ in it.

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    1. I think it was Duz detergent that had the glassware, while Breeze gave away towels. Breeze had commercials with Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner that started with Dolly saying “Look, Porter, free towels in boxes of Buh-reeze!”

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      1. I am a big Dolly fan. I love her songwriting. I will need to look that one up! I was never a fan of Porter Wagner, though…

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        1. To use a Southern expression, I think Dolly Parton hung the moon. She’s single-handedly responsible for revitalizing the Pigeon Forge-Sevierville area in Tennessee. When she built Dollywood, it provided a lot of jobs, not just at the park but in the whole area, because it resulted in hotels, restaurants, and outlet stores. She’s very big on kids learning to read and sends kids books to get them started. If you’ve never been to Dollywood, it’s a trip well worth taking; it’s not all rides…

          Dolly wrote the song “I Will Always Love You” for Porter, when she went off on her own. I like Porter myself. Guys like him and Conway Twitty were my idea of country singers.

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          1. I loved Conway Twitty. I grew up in southwest Va so I am very familiar with Pigeon Forge and Sevierville and Gatlinburg. Before it was Dollywood, it was Frontier Town I believe. I have lots of friends and family whose children have received her free books. Her song “My Tennessee Mountain Home” is an anthem for my youth. I just never cared for Porter Wagoner. Conway yes, Don Williams yes.

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            1. Gatlinburg is a real tourist kind of place, and all I can remember is getting stuck in heavy traffic. We just passed through and decided “yeah… no,” so we went on to Pigeon Forge.

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