#1LinerWeds from David Brinkley

I found this clip a while back and wanted to share it. It’s a little longer than one line, but I think you’ll enjoy it.

You know, considering the current state of music, old David might have a point there, though back in 1962 he was more than a little off.


One-Liner Wednesday is brought to you each week by Linda Hill and this station. Now a word about a special ABC family presentation, Fred Astaire in The Easter Bunny’s Comin’ To Town.

He narrated Santa Claus Is Comin’ To Town, too, didn’t he?

17 thoughts on “#1LinerWeds from David Brinkley

    1. I rarely watch the news anymore. It’s like there are five minutes of actual news and a half hour of “special reports.” If there’s a local story I want to know about, I’ll go to the website. The “news” is so heavily larded with the opinions of the newsreaders, it’s not worth watching. Tell me what happened, and I’ll decide how I feel about it.

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  1. Everyone’s comments hit the mark! All the great Rock n Rollers are soon to be long gone, physically, but I don’t plan on stopping listening to their tunes. I’m happy to see the younger kids take a liking to the music.

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      1. I believe he was in his 40s around that time…back then I have found everyone seemed older than they were…in looks and maturity.

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          1. That is really young. I have told people today’s fathers play video games just as much as their kids…I can’t imagine my dad playing video games…

            My dad was a seventies dad and I believe that is when it started to change. He went from older looking to younger looking with a Burt Reynolds mustache and hair a bit more unruly. The older generation had started to change.

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  2. My mom liked David. I’m not sure rock & roll made that exit on schedule or if I just adapted to what rolled i next. The state of music today seems to fit the state of the news today – not sure I want a part of either.

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    1. Huntley and Brinkley were early version of “happy news,” where the anchors would chat with each other, though it wasn’t anything like it was a few years later. Now that I think about it, “happy news” was actually a pretty good concept. We had one of the early versions of it on WLS-TV (the ABC station), and while they were friendly, they were still quite professional. John Coleman, who did the weather, was kind of a nut, but he went on to start The Weather Channel and do the weather on Good Morning America. (The weatherman is usually kind of a nut, anyway.)

      In 1962, when that show was done, rock & roll had been on a pretty steady decline. To quote the guy from Decca Records who rejected The Beatles, “guitar groups were on their way out.” The Beatles came in and gave the old rock & roll new life and a real kick in the ass. Sadly, I don’t see that happening again: the record companies are run by MBA’s with tin ears…

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  3. I listened through the rock and roll part, chuckled, then agreed with you on the current state of what is considered that genre of music. I am a child of 70’s and 80’s rock. Fleetwood Mac, Eagles, Journey, all of the hair bands like Bon Jovi and Whitesnake. Today’s rock on the radio sounds like pop and I’m not buying it.

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  4. Got a love David Brinkley. I wonder what all the old newsmen from Walter Cronkite to Edward R Murrow would think of the newsmen today who make it known what t(sir political leanings are. Yup, Fred As5aire did narrate Santa Claus and was the puppet narrator in it to.

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