The Friday 5×2: KLEO (1480 AM Wichita, Kansas), August 6, 1973

KLEO was, from 1958 to 1980, the most popular Top 40 station in Wichita, Kansas. Now the station is KQAM, “The Big Talker,” which they’ve been since 2009. Before that, they were the Radio Disney affiliate. KLEO’s call letters are now being used by a FM station in Hilo, Hawaii, broadcasting a Hot Adult Contemporary format. Anyway, here’s KLEO’s Top 10 from August 6, 1973.

  1. Sly & The Family Stone, “If You Want Me To Stay” Sly & The Family Stone changed funk and R&B and had enough crossover power to affect the worlds of rock and pop. This reached #3 on the national R&B chart and #12 on the Hot 100.
  2. Lobo, “How Can I Tell Her” This was Lobo’s fifth Top 10 hit on the AC chart, but only reached #22 on the Hot 100. I don’t even remember this song playing in Chicago.
  3. Jim Stafford, “Swamp Witch” Jim’s first single, it only reached #39 on the Hot 100. “Spiders and Snakes” more than made up for it.
  4. Maureen McGovern, “The Morning After” From the 1972 film The Poseidon Adventure, it won the 1972 Oscar for Best Original Song, then became a hit single, reaching #1 on the Hot 100 for two weeks in August 1973. Billboard ranked it #28 for the whole year. I thought Maureen McGovern qualified as a one-hit wonder, but her “Different Worlds,” theme for the television show Angie, reached #18 on the Hot 100 and #1 on the AC chart a few years later.
  5. Deep Purple, “Smoke On The Water” Deep Purple only had two Top 10 singles, this and “Hush” five years earlier, both reaching #4 on the Hot 100. The riff will live on and on and on…
  6. Gilbert O’Sullivan, “Get Down” Gilbert’s third and last Top 10 single, it reached #7 on the Hot 100 and #3 on the AC chart. He continued to chart well in the UK and Ireland for a few years after this.
  7. Paul McCartney & Wings, “Live And Let Die” The second movie theme in the Top 10 this week, from the James Bond film of the same name, starring a maybe a little too old Roger Moore. It was the first true rock song to be used as a 007 theme and spent 3 weeks at #2.
  8. Bobby “Boris” Pickett & The Crypt Kickers, “Monster Mash” How a 12-year-old Halloween song managed to “rise from the dead,” so to speak, in the middle of 1973 is beyond me, but… anyway, it reached #10 after entering the charts in May.
  9. Charlie Daniels, “Uneasy Rider” Charlie’s first record to chart reached #9 on the Hot 100. Some would call it a novelty record, and they wouldn’t be wrong.
  10. Three Dog Night, “Shambala” This was recorded by both Three Dog Night and B. W. Stephenson (who had a bigger hit a bit later in 1973 with “My Maria”), but only 3DN’s is generally known. It reached #3 on the Hot 100 and did much better in some places.

And that’s your Friday 5×2 for October 11, 2019.

11 thoughts on “The Friday 5×2: KLEO (1480 AM Wichita, Kansas), August 6, 1973

  1. KELO? I lived in Wichita from 1977 to 1981; I don’t remember it. Guess I was too busy listening to KICT, which (I checked) am thrilled to see still exists. Anyway, my one huge surprise here was that Charlie Daniel did Uneasy Rider. I never associated it with him. Other than that, yup, the music of when I was in my final year of college.

    Like

    1. KELO AM, FM and TV are all located in Sioux Falls, SD; KLEO was in Wichita. I think they got out of the Top 40 business in ’80 or so, probably because KICT and others overwhelmed them. It happens…

      Like

  2. Great selections, John. Ah, “The Poseidon Adventure” – interesting movie in a sense. And “Shambala” woke up the crowd when hubby and I saw Three Dog Night. Then there’s “Monster Mash” – it’s funny how wacky songs like this one hang on for years.

    Like

    1. Never saw “The Poseidon Adventure.” Maybe one of the hundred or so movie channels I have access to now will run it some night.

      “Monster Mash” is still popular over 50 years since its release. It’s timeless.

      Like

  3. That’s an odd grouping for me which made me check the year and realize I was in the Air Force and likely not listening to the radio as much. I always enjoy these posts, John.

    Like

You can use Markdown in your comments. Thanks for your comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s