Song Lyric Sunday: “Walk Right In”

‘Tis the season to have new badges, or so it seems… Today’s prompt is “Lean/Sit/Stand.”

“Walk Right In” was a country blues song written by Gus Cannon and first recorded by Cannon’s Jug Stompers in 1929. In 1959 it was reissued on the album The Country Blues, and in 1962 it was revised and recorded by The Rooftop Singers (Erik Darling and Bill Swanhoe, guitars and vocals, and Lynne Taylor, vocals). Wikipedia tells us that Darling wanted the song to have a distinctive sound, so he and Swanhoe played twelve-string guitars. They had to wait for Gibson to make a left-handed version for southpaw Swanhoe, but finally they recorded it in late 1962. The song spent two weeks in 1963 at #1 on the Hot 100, five weeks at #1 on the Easy Listening (later Adult Contemporary, or just AC) chart, and rose to #4 on the R&B chart and #23 on the Country chart. Cannon, who was in his late 70’s, received royalties from the song and also got a recording contract out of the deal.

The lyrics, from Genius.com:

Walk right in, sit right down
Daddy, let your mind roll on
Walk right in, sit right down
Daddy, let your mind roll on

Everybody’s talkin’ ’bout a new way of walkin’
Do you want to lose your mind?
Walk right in, sit right down
Daddy, let your mind roll on

Walk right in, sit right down
Baby, let your hair hang down
Walk right in, sit right down
Baby, let your hair hang down

Everybody’s talkin’ ’bout a new way of walkin’
Do you want to lose your mind?
Walk right in, sit right down
Baby, let your hair hang down

Walk right in, sit right down
Daddy, let your mind roll on
Walk right in, sit right down
Daddy, let your mind roll on

Everybody’s talkin’ ’bout a new way of walkin’
Do you want to lose your mind?
Walk right in, sit right down
Daddy, let your mind roll on
Daddy, let your mind roll on

As a bonus, here is Gus Cannon’s original, from 1929.

That’s Song Lyric Sunday for October 20, 2019.

36 thoughts on “Song Lyric Sunday: “Walk Right In”

    1. They’re both good for different reasons. The original has that fun jug band sound, the remake had that twin 12-string guitars thing going for it. They really helped Gus Cannon by recording that song….

      Liked by 1 person

    1. There were quite a few covers of this song, but The Rooftop Singers and Dr. Hook were the two that got the most attention. I learned it from watching Glen Campbell, as I recall: he was the one that said you need a 12-string to get it right. When I got my 12-string, I just did what he did.

      Liked by 1 person

You can use Markdown in your comments. Thanks for your comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s