Monday’s Music Moves Me: Introducing Paola Hermosín

Paola Hermosín. Source: paolahermosin.com

This young lady knocks me out. An incredible guitarist, wonderful singer, and very talented young woman, Paola Hermosín is from Seville in Spain. The biography on her YouTube channel tells us (as translated by Google Translate):

Paola Hermosín (1995) is a guitarist, singer and composer from Alcala (Seville) who began her musical guitar studies at the García Matos Elementary Conservatory of Alcalá de Guadaíra at the age of 8. She continued at the Francisco Guerrero Professional Conservatory of Seville, obtaining an Honorary Award and finished at the Manuel Castillo Superior Conservatory of Seville with an Honorary Degree and End of Degree Award. She combined her musical studies with the Degree in Primary Education with a Musical Mention, ending with a brilliant record, so she also dedicates herself to teaching. In 2019, she finished the Master in Flamenco Research and Analysis with the best grades and makes her music known through concerts and social networks such as YouTube, Instagram or Facebook, as well as sells her guitar arrangements and original compositions on her website.

She has quite a few videos on her YouTube channel. I chose ten of my favorites. She explains on most of these what she’s playing and some of the history behind the piece and some notes about technique. Be sure to turn on subtitles unless you speak Spanish, and even then it might not be a bad idea.

  1. Cuando sabes que estás soñando (When you know you’re dreaming) – An original composition.
  2. "Bohemian Rhapsody" – Yes, she arranged Queen’s song for solo guitar. She does a little shredding on electric guitar at the end of the video.
  3. "The Four Seasons" by Vivaldi: Spring I. Allegro – An orchestral piece she arranged.
  4. Tico-Tico No Fubá – A Brazilian choro (which she explains before playing it) written by Zequinha de Abreu in 1917.
  5. Capricho Arabe by Francisco Tarrega – Tarrega is often called "the father of classical guitar." Some beautiful photography in this.
  6. Mas, que nada! – Jorge Ben’s bossa nova piece that’s been covered by Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66 and The Black-Eyed Peas. Paola sings this and plays a solo in the middle of the song, which you see on an inset.
  7. La vie en rose – Edith Piaf’s classic song. Paola sings both the French and the Spanish lyrics here.
  8. "Harry Potter" – She arranged John Williams’s opening theme to the Harry Potter movies for solo guitar.
  9. "Skye Boat Song" – A traditional Scottish song (I played it on the bagpipes) that was used in the movie Outlander. She sings in English very well, as you’ll hear.
  10. "On The Sunny Side Of The Street" – Yes, she plays ukulele, too. The song was written in 1930 by Jimmy McHugh with lyrics by Dorothy Fields.

I hope you’ll look for Paola on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and Spotify as well as YouTube. That’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for March 8, 2021.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Cathy, Alana, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.

9 thoughts on “Monday’s Music Moves Me: Introducing Paola Hermosín

  1. Yours is one of the WordPress sites I can’t seem to comment on. I hope this goes through – I enjoyed the voice and the playing – she is very, very good.

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    1. I’m getting your comments just fine, and as far as I know always have. What are you seeing at your end?

      I’m glad you enjoyed Paola. I try to feature some of the people I find online whenever I can. There are so many talented people that we might never have heard of until YouTube, Spotify, and the social media sites made it possible for them to reach out. Technology has helped to democratize the entertainment business, in that artists are no longer beholden to a few professional starmakers to become popular.

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  2. Hi John – I must look some of her work out – thanks for telling us about her – and I can learn too … fascinating young lady – great to see her and hear her. Thanks – Hilary

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