The Autumnal Equinox Week That Was

This edition of The Week That Was is brought to you by Pabst Blue Ribbon Beer. Finest beer served anywhere!

I have to apologize for not keeping up with the Hogan’s Heroes episodes. There are so many things to do and no time to do them in. I hope to get caught up, or at least do more summaries than I did last week (that’s not setting the bar too high, mind you) in the weeks ahead.

It’s certainly been fall-like here the last several weeks, even though autumn doesn’t "officially" start until the autumnal equinox, which TimeandDate.com tells me is at 3:21 PM this coming Wednesday.

Anyway, here’s the summary for the week.

Songs about working, in honor of "National Boss/Employee Exchange Program" day. This week, another freebie!

Questions included whether we will have said or done more when all is said and done, what the world could use a whole lot less of, whether we feel younger or older than we are, and what cause we’ll always passionately support.

Went over #11-20 on the year-end Hot 100 of 1980.

Shared a deep thought about whether those are really stars above our head when we look up into the night sky, or something else

My latest Battle pits Mike Oldfield and Maggie Reilly up against Hall & Oates, the song being "Family Man." I’ll announce the winner on Wednesday, so be sure and get your vote to me by Tuesday night. We have a hot contest going, so make your voice heard on this one.

We needed songs that had a boy’s name in the title, the name of a place in the title, and a song that Kenny Loggins wrote.

We started with a picture of a cat hiding in a toilet, and I wrote about how cats have an uncanny knack for getting into small places and sleeping.

I wrote a post in 12 lines, or sentences. It was mostly stream-of-consciousness fare.

I featured the music of Ethel Smith, the First Lady of the Hammond Organ.

Our prompt this week was "puzzle," which sent me off on a conversation about doing crossword puzzles.

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