Five For Friday: John Barry

We celebrated the birtday of British film composer John Barry this past week, so I thought it might be nice to cover some of the music he composed today. Also, I wanted to do a shout-out to Birgit, who’s having some medical issues. I know this is her kind of music…

  1. The Lion In Winter Theme: From the 1968 movie starring Kathryn Hepburn and Peter O’Toole. Barry won the 1968 Academy Award for Best Original Score and the 1968 Anthony Asquith Award for Film Music from BAFTA for this.

  2. Danish National Symphony Orchestra, "James Bond Theme": Monty Norman actually wrote the theme, which was first used in the 1962 film Dr. No, but Barry’s arrangement made it the enduring hit it is now. The Danish National Symphony Orchestra did a concert in April 2020 called "Agents Are Forever," in which they did music from a number of spy-oriented films and TV shows. I’ll try to play more in the coming weeks.

  3. Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, "Out Of Africa Theme": Barry took home the 1985 Academy Award and Golden Globe for Best Original Score for this score.

  4. Band of the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, "John Dunbar Theme (Dances With Wolves)": Barry went home with the 1990 Academy Award for the score for the movie Dances With Wolves starring Kevin Costner. You might remember the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards from their pipes and drums’ rendition of "Amazing Grace" in 1972.

  5. Born Free (Main Title): Barry won the 1966 Academy Awards for both the Original Score and Original song, which we played the other day.

  6. Chaplin Main Theme/"Smile": In 1992, Barry was nominated for both the Golden Globe and the Academy Award for Best Original Score, but Alan Menken took home both trophies for the score of Aladdin. Can’t win ’em all, I guess.

John Barry, your Five For Friday, November 5, 2021.

3 thoughts on “Five For Friday: John Barry

  1. Hi John – I’ve always loved the ‘Out of Africa’ theme … and John Barry wrote some amazing music – gorgeous … thanks so much fo these – cheers Hilary

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