#atozchallenge: INY

INY is an acronym for "I need you," I guess when you’re texting someone. Here are a few songs called "I Need You." The first was written by George Harrison and was used in the 1965 movie Help!, starring The Beatles, Leo McKern, and Eleanor Bron. It’s also on the album.

The next is by America, written by Gerry Beckley (who also sang lead), from their eponymous 1971 debut album.

Lynyrd Skynyrd had a song called "I Need You" on their 1974 album Second Helping. It was written by Ed King, Gary Rossington, and Ronnie Van Zant.

Tim McGraw did his "I Need You" with Faith Hill (his wife) on his 2007 album Let It Go. It was written by David Lee and Tony Lane. As a single, it reached #8 on the US Country chart and #4 on the Canadian Country chart.

Finally, Jon Batiste did his "I Need You" for his 2021 album We Are. The song was written by Jon and Autumn Rowe and was released as a single in 2020, reaching #2 on the Adult Alternative Airplay chart.

And I just realized that, by playing five songs, this will also work as my Five For Friday post.

23 thoughts on “#atozchallenge: INY

  1. I didn’t realize INY was for I need you. I never heard of it before πŸ™‚ Not sure I would use it when texting or communicating electronically with someone πŸ™‚

    betty

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  2. Love how you handled Y John – very clever. And thanks for adding to my education. I’d forgotten about America’s song. and I think that might be my favorite of the group.

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    1. Actually, that was George (he wrote the song), but it’s a great song, isn’t it? He used a volume pedal on it, which caused quite a stir. From what I heard, the next day there was a run on them at music stores.

      With the Jon Batiste video, the dancing was absolutely outstanding.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. No problem! For years I thought Paul sang “Chains” and “Do You Want To Know A Secret?” on “Please Please Me”/”Introducing… The Beatles!” It was George. You really couldn’t tell in a lot of cases.

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