Monday’s Music Moves Me: Pink

Some time ago, I was working on a series where I was finding songs with specific color in them. I don’t think I ever did “pink,” so here are ten songs with that color in the title. Most of these I knew, but a few I had to find. Enjoy!

  1. Joe Liggins & The Honeydrippers, “Pink Champagne” Joe Liggins was a blues and R&B pianist who led his band The Honeydrippers in the 1940’s and 1950’s. His biggest hit was “The Honeydripper,” recorded in 1945. This reached #1 for 13 weeks on the R&B chart (then called the “race records” chart) and #30 on the Pop chart in 1950.
  2. Perez Prado, “Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White” Cuban bandleader Prado recorded this in 1955 for the movie Underwater, and it reached #1 for ten weeks that year.
  3. Carl Perkins, “Pink Cadillac” The master rockabilly guitarist covers Bruce Springsteen’s song and does it better than “The Boss” did, in my opinion.
  4. Jerry Wallace, “Touch of Pink” Wallace is best known for “Primrose Lane,” which he took to #8 in 1959. This is the Jerry’s record just before that one, which barely cracked the Hot 100, coming in at #92.
  5. Mitchell Torok, “Pink Chiffon” Country singer/songwriter Torok had his greatest chart success with “Caribbean,” which reached #1 on the Country chart in 1953. This only reached #60 on the Pop chart in 1960. I thought it was good, anyway…
  6. Dodie Stevens, “Pink Shoelaces” Dodie was one day short of 13 when ths debuted on the Pop chart at #96. It eventually reached #3. Cute, isn’t she?
  7. Henry Mancini, “The Pink Panther Theme” I figure that if I didn’t include this one, everybody’d ask “Why didn’t you include The Pink Panther theme?” During my first A to Z Challenge back in 2012, I talked about Mancini and his working relationship with director Blake Edwards, and this was maybe the most famous collaboration between the two.
  8. Marty Robbins, “A White Sportcoat (And A Pink Carnation)” In the early days of rock & roll, Country stars regularly crossed over onto the Pop chart. This was a big hit for him, reaching #1 on the Country chart and #2 on the Pop chart, and #1 in Australia in 1957.
  9. Karl Sapp, “White Lightning or Pink Champagne” Allmusic tells me Karl has three albums out and that this can be found on the second album, 2007’s *Words and Music.” That’s as far as it goes. Good song, though.
  10. The Psychedelic Furs, “Pretty In Pink” Molly Ringwald evidently told director John Hughes that this was her favorite song, and the built the movie around it. Or maybe not. Anyway, this was on their second album, 1981’s Talk Talk Talk, and it reached #43 in the UK.

And that’s Mondy’s Music Moves Me for April 6, 2020.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, Alana, and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.

Song of the Day: Junior Wells and Buddy Guy, “Help Me”

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Harp player Junior Wells and guitarist Buddy Guy first worked together on Junior’s 1965 album Hoodoo Man Blues and they played together on and off until Junior’s death in 1998. In the mid-’70’s they played regularly in a band that also included Buddy’s brother Phil on guitar and A. C. Reed (Jimmy Reed’s brother) on saxophone. Some friends of mine and I went see them at a club named Ratso’s and spent way too much money, and never regretted a penny of it. Here Junior pays tribute to one of his teachers, Sonny Boy Williamson II (aka Alex “Rice” Miller). During this period, Buddy took a break from his Stratocaster and was playing a Guild 335 lookalike.

Song Lyric Sunday/Song of the Day: Eileen Barton, “If I Knew You Were Coming, I’d’ve Baked A Cake”

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Oh, I have a good one for you today, when the prompt(s) is(are) “Birthday, Cake, Gift, Party, Surprise” (maybe because Jim, our fearless leader in this endeavor, is having a birthday?). I know for a fact it’s my high school friend Mark’s birthday. Mark, if you’re reading this, Happy Birthday, and don’t forget, better over the hill than under it.

Today’s song is Eileen Barton’s “If I Knew You Were Coming, I’d’ve Baked a Cake.” Here’s what The Blogger’s Best Friend ™ says about it:

“If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake” is a popular song written by Al Hoffman, Bob Merrill, and Clem Watts and published in 1950.

The best known version of the song was recorded by Eileen Barton in January 1950. The recording was released by National Records as catalog number 9103. When the song became too big a hit for National to handle, it arranged with Mercury Records to help with distribution. The record first reached the Billboard charts on March 3, 1950 and lasted 15 weeks on the chart, peaking at #1. The song was one of Tom Dowd’s first hits as a producer.

In 1962, Barton’s recording of the song was included in a list of 101 Perennial Singles Hits compiled by Billboard – a group “For year-round programming by juke box operators and radio stations … a catalog of standards that can provide consistent earnings for operators and a wealth of material for discussion by broadcasters.”

Here are the lyrics, ftom Lyrics.com, though hers are a little different on the record:

Well, well, well, look who’s here.
I haven’t seen you in many a year.
If I knew you were comin’ I’d ‘ve baked a cake,
baked a cake, baked a cake.
If I knew you were comin’ I’d ‘ve baked a cake.
How-ja do. How-ja do, How-ja do.

Had you dropped me a letter I’d ‘ve hired a band,
grandest band in the land.
Had you dropped me a letter I’d ‘ve hired a band
and spread the welcome mat for you.

Now I don’t know where you came from
’cause I don’t know where you’ve been.
But it really doesn’t matter
grab a chair and fill your platter
and dig dig dig right in.

If I knew you were comin’ I’d ‘ve baked a cake,
hired a band, goodness sake.
If I knew you were comin’ I’d ‘ve baked a cake.
How-ja do. How-ja do. How-ja do.

If I knew you were comin’ I’d ‘ve baked a cake,
baked a cake, baked a cake.
If I knew you were comin’ I’d ‘ve baked a cake.
How-ja do. How-ja do, How-ja do.

Had you dropped me a letter I’d ‘ve hired a hall,
great big hall, band and all.
Had you dropped me a letter I’d ‘ve hired a hall
and spread the welcome mat for you.

Now I don’t know where you came from
’cause I don’t know where you’ve been.
But it really doesn’t matter
grab a chair and fill your platter
and dig dig dig right in.

If I knew you were comin’ I’d ‘ve kept the pot,
coffee pot nice and hot.
If I knew you were comin’ I’d ‘ve baked a cake.
How-ja do. How-ja do. How-ja do.

And that’s Song Lyric Sunday (and Song of the Day) for April 5, 2020.

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Red #atozchallenge

The trapezoid from yesterday, because it’s red.

Every time I try to talk about the electromagnetic spectrum, I manage to snag my britches on my own pitchfork, as Andy Taylor would say on The Andy Griffith Show. Anyway, above the frequencies used for radio and television waves, but below the x-rays and gamma rays on the spectrum, is the visible segment of the spectrum, where you find our friend Roy G. Biv, i.e. the colors of the rainbow, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. Red has the longest wavelength of the colors, roughly 675 to 700 nanometers (or 6750 to 7000 Angstroms, or 0.000027 to 0.000028 inches). Waves longer than those, from 1 to 10 micrometers, are infrared waves, which are handy for TV remotes.

Redheaded sisters. Image by Lorri Lang from Pixabay

Red is also a hair color, which occurs naturally in roughly 1-2% of the population. Among that 1-2% are my sister-in-law and about half the cousins on the Holton side of the family. When it wasn’t all white or gray, my hair had red highlights in it. Mom always used to say that I should have been a redhead, because, in addition to the red highlights, I have fair skin and lots of freckles and I burn really easily if I don’t use sunscreen.

(And here’s my annual reminder to everyone, regardless of what color your hair is: wear sunscreen. Melanoma is nothing to screw around with. And those of you who like tanning beds, for the sake of your friends and family, please stop using them. They’re more dangerous than the sun. People would rather see you with pale skin than see you in a hospital bed.)

Me in 8th grade. I don’t know if my hair was that red or if the colors faded over 50 years.

Wikipedia (which earns the title The Blogger’s Best Friend™ every day) has a list of redheaded people. It doesn’t include fictional characters, like Anne Shirley from Anne of Green Gables or Archie Andrews from the comic books, Saturday morning cartoons, and Riverdale. And speaking of Archie, here are The Archies with "Sugar, Sugar."

Natural redheads are almost all of Northern or Northwestern European descent. There are probably more redheads in Ireland than the rest of the world, with Scotland running a close second. There are quite a few in Germany, as it happens, and in Scandinavia. I once heard about a connection between the Vikings and red hair, but most of the sources I saw said that was largely a myth.