Song Lyric Sunday: The Beatles, “Savoy Truffle”

Angie at King Ben’s Grandma gave Jim the prompt for today, “sweet, honey, sugar, candy, chocolate.” My contribution for today is The Beatles’ “Savoy Truffle,” from The Beatles, commonly called the “white album.” It’s the third song on Side 4 (record 2, side 2) and was written and sung by George Harrison.

George got the idea from watching his friend Eric Clapton, a huge chocolate fan, dig into a box of Mackintosh’s “Good News” chocolates while at George’s house. George used the names of the chocolates as listed on the lid of the box as his inspiration for the lyrics The last line of the verse, “but you’ll have to have them all pulled out after the Savoy Truffle,” referred to the tooth decay that would be caused by so much chocolate which would then necessitate extraction.

The line in the second bridge verse about “Oh-Bla-Di-Bla-Da” was a minor dig at bandmate Paul McCartney, who had just about driven them crazy trying to perfect that song on the album.

Creme tangerine and Montelimar
A ginger sling with a pineapple heart
Coffee dessert, yes, you know it’s good news
But you’ll have to have them all pulled out
After the Savoy truffle

Cool cherry cream, nice apple tart
I feel your taste all the time we’re apart
Coconut fudge – really blows down those blues (woo!)
But you’ll have to have them all pulled out
After the Savoy truffle

You might not feel it now
But when the pain cuts through
You’re going to know and how
The sweat is going to fill your head
When it becomes too much
You’ll shout aloud

[Guitar Solo]

But you’ll have to have them all pulled out
After the Savoy truffle

You know that what you eat you are
But what is sweet now, turns so sour
We all know Ob-La-Di-Bla-Da
But can you show me, where you are?

Creme tangerine and Montelimar
A ginger sling with a pineapple heart
Coffee dessert, yes, you know it’s good news (woo!)
But you’ll have to have them all pulled out
After the Savoy truffle
But you’ll have to have them all pulled out
After the Savoy truffle

Source: Genius

And that’s Song Lyric Sunday (and Song of the Day) for September 25, 2022.

Song of the Day: Gerry & The Pacemakers, “Ferry Cross The Mersey”

Gerry Marsden, frontman and leader of the 1960’s Merseybeat band Gerry & The Pacemakers, would be turning 80 today (he died in January 2021). Like The Beatles, they came from Liverpool, were managed by Brian Epstein, and were recorded by George Martin. “Ferry Cross The Mersey” was written by Gerry and was from the soundtrack of the film of the same name. Released in late 1964, it reached #6 in the US and #8 in the UK.

Song of the Day: John Coltrane, “Giant Steps”

Saxophonist John Coltrane, one of the most influential jazz musicians of his time, was born on this day in 1926. His influence could be felt in the areas of hard bop, modal jazz, free jazz, and avant-garde jazz. The jazz standard “Giant Steps” was written by Coltrane and was the title track from his 1960 album. The chord changes in the song are considered some of the most difficult in jazz, and are referred to as the “Coltrane Changes.”

Song of the Day: Gary Holton and Casino Steel, “Baby I Love You”

As far as I know, if singer and actor Gary Holton is a relative, he’s a very distant one. Today would be his 70th birthday. Sadly, he died at the age of 33 of an overdose of morphine and alcohol. In the mid-1980’s he joined forces with Norwegian musician Casino Steel, and they produced a couple of albums that sold well in Norway. “Baby I Love You” was written by Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich, and Phil Spector and originally recorded by the Ronettes in 1963. It has also been recorded by Andy Kim and The Ramones. This performance is from 1984.

Song of the Day: Swing Out Sister, “Am I The Same Girl?”

Singer Corinne Drewery, one-half of the duo Swing Out Sister, turns 63 today. “Am I The Same Girl?” was originally done by Barbara Acklin in 1968 and was covered by Dusty Springfield in 1969. Young-Holt Unlimited (featuring Isaac “Red” Holt and Eldee Young from the Ramsey Lewis Trio) did an instrumental version called “Soulful Strut” in 1969. Swing Out Sister’s version was recorded in 1992 for their album Get In Touch With Yourself. It reached #1 on the US Adult Contemporary chart and at European Dance Radio, and #5 in Canada. Here is a 1992 performance at Camden’s Jazz Cafe in London.