Song Lyric Sunday: “Our House”

I love this song too much to try and pick something a little more obscure. Jim’s prompt for today is “Floor/House/Roof/Walls” and my choice is “Our House” by the British band Madness. Written by band members Chris Foreman and Cathal Smyth, it was on their 1982 album The Rise & Fall and became a Top 10 hit internationally, including #7 in the US.

Lyrics from MetroLyrics:

Father wears his Sunday best
Mother’s tired she needs a rest
The kids are playing up downstairs
Sister’s sighing in her sleep
Brother’s got a date to keep
He can’t hang around

Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, in the middle of our

Our house it has a crowd
There’s always something happening
And it’s usually quite loud
Our mum she’s so house-proud
Nothing ever slows her down
And a mess is not allowed

Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, in the middle of our …
Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, in the middle of our …

Father gets up late for work
Mother has to iron his shirt
Then she sends the kids to school
Sees them off with a small kiss
She’s the one they’re going to miss
In lots of ways

Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, in the middle of our …

I remember way back then when everything was true and when
We would have such a very good time such a fine time
Such a happy time
And I remember how we’d play simply waste the day away
Then we’d say nothing would come between us two dreamers

Father wears his Sunday best
Mother’s tired she needs a rest
The kids are playing up downstairs
Sister’s sighing in her sleep
Brother’s got a date to keep
He can’t hang around

Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, in the middle of our …
Our house, was our castle and our keep
Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, that was where we used to sleep
Our house, in the middle of our street
Our house, in the middle of our street

That’s Song Lyric Sunday for September 15, 2019.

BATTLE OF THE BANDS: “Cherish”

Third time’s a charm, right? We’re going to do the “same name, different songs” thing again, only this time we have two songs that were Top 10 hits about 20 years apart. The name of the song in either case is “Cherish,” and here are the contestants.

Kool & The Gang

Released in 1985, the third song from the band’s 1984 album Emergency, this song was a #1 hit on the Adult Contemporary chart six weeks running and was certified Gold by RIAA.

The Association

From their 1966 album And Then… Along Comes The Association, this was a #1 hit on the Hot 100 for three weeks and ultimately was named the #2 song for the year.

You probably know what to do by now, but here are the instructions in case you’re new to this:

  1. Listen to the two songs.
  2. Decide which song you like the best.
  3. Vote for your favorite by leaving me a comment with your choice. If you feel like telling us why, feel free.
  4. Then, visit the other participants and vote in their Battles:

Remember, you can vote in this battle whether or not you have a battle of your own. All you need are at least one good ear and your opinion.

I’ll announce the winner next Sunday, September 22, so be sure and get your vote to me by then.

The lines are now open. Good luck to Kool & The Gang and The Association!

I Got Them #socs Blues

So it’s Friday afternoon, I’m at Starbucks, and the prompt is “blue.” Specifically, the first blue thing I see. Well, I’m wearing a blue shirt. See?

Click for full size

This is one of my Mary-approved shirts to go out in. Most, if not all, of those are various shades of blue. She decided I wear too much blue and bought me a couple of new shirts. One is pink, specifically to be worn on Laetare Sunday and Gaudete Sunday, the two dates in the Catholic calendar where the priest wears pink (officially “rose”) vestments. The other is like a Day-Glo green, which she’s decided she really likes, so I expect more Day-Glo colors in the future. I already have a shirt that can best be described as Department of Transportation orange, so I don’t suppose orange will be another color.

I found my “Blue” playlist. There’s another here, and I’m sure there are a few more.


Stream of Consciousness Saturday is brought to you each week by Linda Hill and this station. Now a word about Charmin bathroom tissue. So fluffy, so squeezably soft, it’s irresistable!

Mr. Whipple is played by character actor Dick Wilson, who shows up on “Hogan’s Heroes” all the time.

The Friday 5×2: The Hot 100 for August 22, 1964

I talk a lot about the Hot 100, Billboard‘s top 100 pop songs at the end of a given week as determined by record sales, radio station requests, and jukebox plays (are there jukeboxes anywhere anymore? I haven’t seen one in years). This week, I found a picture of the Hot 100 on Pinterest for August 22, 1964, and thought it was interesting enough to share with you today.

  1. Gerry & The Pacemakers, “How Do You Do It” One one of The Beatles’ Anthology albums (I think it’s the second), there’s a version of this song by the Fab Four that never made it to a record. Maybe they knew that Gerry Marsden and his band, fellow Merseybeat musicians, would do it better. For the record, they did.
  2. Dusty Springfield, “Wishin’ and Hopin'” The lovely Miss Dusty was a favorite of the disk jockeys in Chicago, who called playing one of her records “a date with Dusty.” Those of us in the 3rd and 4th grades would tear our hair out, because we couldn’t appreciate her voice. We can now. At least, I can.
  3. The Ventures, “Walk Don’t Run ’64” A slightly different version of this classic. They had switched from Fender to Mosrite guitars shortly before they recorded this, and were obviously experimenting with some new sounds.
  4. Dave Clark 5, “Because” The DC5 don’t get heard much these days, due to business decisions they made about licensing and releasing their music. It’s a real shame, too, because in the mid-’60’s they were second only to The Beatles in popularity, and they had a great sound (the “Tottenham Sound”) that made them unique.
  5. Bobby Freeman, “C’mon and Swim” The Swim was the latest dance craze, and of course in order to be a dance craze there had to be a song to go along with it, to help you with the steps and whatnot.
  6. The Animals, “The House of the Rising Sun” This is considered to be the song that introduced us to folk rock, and it became wildly popular: in its third week on the Hot 100, it moved from #60 to #5.
  7. The Drifters, “Under The Boardwalk” Wikipedia tells us that this was the week this song reached its peak. Since then, the song has been covered by just about everyone.
  8. The Beatles, “A Hard Day’s Night” Title song from The Fab Four’s 1964 movie, which is still one of my favorites. The iconic chord at the beginning is an F add 9, in case you were wondering.
  9. Dean Martin, “Everybody Loves Somebody” In the comments, someone said that his uncle went to see Dean in Las Vegas back in the ’60’s, but couldn’t get in because he wasn’t wearing a tie. Dean heard this, and sent a tie out for the guy to wear. How many performers would do that today?
  10. The Supremes, “Where Did Our Love Go?” I love watching The Supremes in the ’60’s performances, because not only do they sing beautifully, they look gorgeous in those gowns. Don’t they?

That’s The Friday 5×2 for September 13, 2019.