Monday’s Music Moves Me: The #40’s Of 1963

Continuing my #40 series, here are the #40 songs on the WLS Silver Dollar Survey for the last Friday of each month. This week, 1963.

  • January 25: The Matys Bros., “Who Stole The Keeshka?” A polka, because polkas were always popular in Chicago. You’ll note the phonetic spelling of the word kishka… This spent five weeks on the survey, peaking at #17.
  • February 22: Marvin Gaye, “Hitchhike” Marvin was still gaining traction when this was released. It peaked the following week at #36 before dropping off the survey.
  • March 29: Bobby Vinton, “Over The Mountain (Across The Sea)” Some schmaltz from Bobby Vinton, and don’t you love it? Spent five weeks on the survey, peaking at #19.
  • April 26: Etta James, “Pushover” I’m surprised this didn’t take off better than it did. Spent four weeks on the survey, peaking at #28.
  • May 31: Fats Domino, “There Goes My Heart Again” Considering this song only reached #59 nationally, Fats did all right in Chicago. Spent three weeks on the survey, peaking at #35.
  • June 28: Al Casey, “Surfin’ Hootenanny” Both surfing and hootenannies were popular in 1963, so Al figured that if you put them together, they’d be a big hit. Try again, Al. Nevertheless, it reached #27 after five weeks on the survey.
  • July 26: The Cookies, “Will Power” A Gerry Goffin-Carole King song; The Cookies did several of their songs, including “Chains,” later covered by The Beatles. Peaked at #34 in its second week, also its last.
  • August 30: Kelly Garrett, “Tommy Makes Girls Cry” This entered the survey at #36, because the four songs occupying #37-40 (Sam Cooke’s “Frankie and Johnny,” The Miracles’ “Mickey’s Monkey,” Kyu Sakamoto’s “China Nights” (at least they didn’t rename it “Tempura” or “Yakitori”), and Gene Chandler’s “Man’s Temptation”) were on their way down from higher positions, so I decided to feature this instead. It fell to #40 the following week and spent two more weeks on the survey, peaking at #23.
  • September 27: The Orlons, “Crossfire” This rockin’ little number spent four weeks on the survey and also peaked at #23.
  • October 25: The Allisons, “Surfer Street” This is all Wikipedia had to say aout The Allisons: “The Allisons were an American girl group who had a minor hit with the song ‘Surfer Street.’ This song was released on Tip Records and charted for one week in December 1963, in the number 93 position. The song capitalized on the popularity of early 1960’s surfing culture.” It spent three weeks on the chart at WLS, peaking at #32.
  • November 29: Jan and Dean, “Drag City” This was the one success story for 1963 as far as #40’s go. It spent ten weeks on the chart and reached #1 for a week in January.
  • December 27: The Cookies, “Girls Grow Up Faster Than Boys” Finally, we have this little gem which was written by Gerry Goffin and Jack Keller. It spent five weeks on the chart and peaked at #31.

And that’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for February 11, 2019.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, Alana, Michelle and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.

Monday’s Music Moves Me: The #40’s of 1962

A couple of weeks ago, I played the #40 song on the WLS Silver Dollar Survey from the last survey of each month in 1961. This week, let’s do the same for 1962. This time, I followed the songs as they progressed through the survey. In some cases, they vanished almost immediately.

  • 1/27/62 – Marlowe Morris Quintet, “Play The Thing” Marlowe played piano and organ, and was a distant relative of Fats Waller. He recorded with jazz greats Lester Young, Tiny Grimes, and Coleman Hawkins, among others. Disc jockey Jim Bartlett said of this song, “‘Play the Thing’ features some tasty playing behind Marlowe, although his roller-rink organ style probably isn’t for everybody.” Rose to #38 the following week, then dropped off the survey.
  • 2/24/62 – Saverio Saridis, “Love Is The Sweetest Thing” Saridis earned the sobriquet “The Singing N.Y. Cop,” and he had a pretty nice voice, but his song vanished from the survey by the following week.
  • 3/31/62 – The Angels, “Cry Baby Cry” The Angels had a big hit the following year with “My Boyfriend’s Back,” which topped the chart. This song, on the other hand, rose to #37, then exited quietly.
  • 4/28/62 – Marty Robbins, “Love Can’t Wait” This was a minor hit on the Country (#12) and Adult Contemporary (#18) charts, but didn’t do so well on Top 40 stations. On WLS, it was gone the next week.
  • 5/26/62 – Barbara English, “La Ta Tee Ta Ta” Barbara had a brief acting career in the ’50’s and ’60’s, mostly guest appearances on TV dramas such as Peter Gunn, 77 Sunset Strip, and The Twilight Zone. This spent a couple more weeks on the survey, rising as high as #34 before saying ta-ta.
  • 6/30/62 – Lawrence Welk, “Theme From The Wonderful World of The Brothers Grimm From the 1962 fantasy film that starred Laurence Harvey and Karlheinz Böhm and a whole lot of stars besides them. Welk’s cover rose to #32 the following week, then dropped off the survey.
  • 7/28/62 – The Duprees, “You Belong To Me” The one legitimate hit among this group (and a beautiful song besides), it spent nine weeks on the survey, rising to #4.
  • 8/25/62 – Joey Dee & The Starliters, “What Kind Of Love Is This?” Joey and company had a couple of big hits in the early ’60’s, “Peppermint Twist” (#1) and “Shout” (#6). In Chicago, it spent eight weeks on the charts, peaking at #9. Nationally, it rose to #18.
  • 9/29/62 – Bobby Darin, “If A Man Answers” Theme song from Bobby’s and wife Sandra Dee’s 1962 movie. The movie did well at the box office and was nominated for a couple of Golden Globes, but the theme song wasn’t as fortunate, only rising to #32 nationally. It spent four weeks on the survey at WLS, peaking at #25.
  • 10/27/62 – Dean Christie, “Heartbreaker” Can’t find anything about Dean or the record, but it spent five weeks on the WLS survey, peaking at #17.
  • 11/24/62 – Gene McDaniels, “Spanish Lace” Gene is probably best known for “100 Pounds of Clay,” which he took to #3 on the Hot 100. This spent one more week on the chart at #33, pretty close to his #31 nationally.
  • 12/29/62 – Jan Bradley, “Mama Didn’t Lie” Discovered by manager Don Talty, who had her audition for Curtis Mayfield. Her first record, Mayfield’s “We Girls,” was a local hit in Chicago and around the Midwest, and this record went to #8 on the R&B chart and #14 on the Hot 100, but went nowhere on The Big 89. It spent three more weeks on the survey, peaking at #30.

And that’s your Monday’s Music Moves Me for January 28, 2018.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, Alana, Michelle and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.

Monday’s Music Moves Me: Start At The Bottom, 1961

I remember picking up the WLS Silver Dollar Survey every Friday from a record shop on Morse Avenue. Most of my attention was on the Top 10, but I’d always try and catch the song at #40, which was usually a new song. More often than not, it never got very far, unless it was from a band like The Beatles (and their songs usually broke in higher than that). So, here’s what I’m going to do: I’m going to play the #40 song from the WLS Silver Dollar Survey for the last survey of each month in 1961 (and thanks to my friends at Oldiesloon for curating the surveys). You can see where I’m going with this, can’t you?

  • January 28: The Diamonds, “Daddy Cool” This one didn’t even chart for this Canadian quartet. Seventeen years later, Mary and I were married on this day.
  • February 25: Bobby Darin, “Lazy River” Only reached #14 nationally, but went to #2 in the UK.
  • March 25: Jerry Lee Lewis, “What’d I Say” Jerry Lee’s cover of Ray Charles’s #1 hit only reached #30 on the Hot 100 and #27 on the Country chart, but went to #10 in the UK. This was on my fifth birthday.
  • April 29: Gene Pitney, “Louisiana Mama” A song that didn’t chart nationally. Gene would have to wait until later in 1961 for chart success.
  • May 27: The Brothers Four, “Frogg” Reached #32 on the Hot 100. The Brothers were unable to repeat the success they had with “Greenfields” the year before.
  • June 24: The Drifters, “Please Stay” While this didn’t reach the Top 10, it reached #14 on the Hot 100 and #13 on the R&B chart, so it was a minor hit for them. This was an early hit for songwriter Burt Bacharach, and Dionne Warwick sang backup.
  • July 29: Johnny Crawford, “Daydreams” Only reached #70 for Johnny, who excelled as Mark McCain on The Rifleman with Chuck Connors.
  • August 26: Jose Jimenez, “Astronaut (Part 1)” Political correctness hadn’t yet caught on in 1961, and Bill Dana’s “Jose Jimenez” schtick was a huge hit. This peaked at #19 and launched (sorry) his career.
  • September 30: Duane Eddy, “My Blue Heaven” From his album The Twang’s The Thang, it only reached #50 nationwide.
  • October 28: Faron Young, “Back Track” Country star Faron Young had a hit on the country chart with this, which reached #8 there, but it didn’t cross over so well, only reahing #89 on the pop chart.
  • November 25: Johnny Hallyday, “One More Time” I’ve seen his name around, but this was the first I heard him. Hallyday was a French rock singer. This doesn’t seem to have gone anywhere in this country, and I can’t find it anywhere…
  • December 30: Bob Conrad, “Love You” You know Bob Conrad as Robert Conrad, who starred in The Wild Wild West and Baa Baa Black Sheep (also known as Black Sheep Squadron) and a series of commercials for Eveready batteries. As you can see, this is from a collection of songs sung by actors that also included a song by Dwayne Hickman, better known as Dobie Gillis. Can’t find any information on his singing career, but he was hardly a “golden throat.”

Next time I do this (probably in two weeks), I’ll try and follow the songs through their lives on the Silver Dollar Survey. I sorta ran out of time this week…

That’s Monday’s Music Moves Me for January 14, 2019.

Monday’s Music Moves Me is sponsored by X-Mas Dolly, Callie, Cathy, Alana, Michelle and Stacy, so be sure and visit them, where you can also find the Linky for the other participants.